Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

    I've been measuring teaspoons, tablespoons, cups, ounces,etc. to find out how much is in one capful of Prime.

    One capful fills up one tablespoon, which takes 2 tablespoons or 4 capfuls for one ounce. I'm not confused with teaspoons, because I know that 1 teaspoon equals 5ml, but two teaspoons cannot equal one ounce; so, I'm not being paranoid here.

    In fact, it would be the measuring cup, that measures the ounces, that is wrong. However, despite there being many types of measuring spoons as well, I thought I should get a measuring cup that measures 1/4 , 2/4, 3/4, and one cup. 1/4 of a cup is equal to 4 tablespoons, however, it took 6 capfuls to fil 1/4 of a cup. Again, 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml, but 6 teaspoons equals 0.125 cups. In other words, 12 teaspoons or 12 capfuls would be needed to fil 1/4 of a cup; thus, 1 capful of Prime should be equal to 10 ml. I know for fact 1 capful per tablespoon might be a bit off, which means 1.5 capfuls should equal one tablespoon, however, as far as 6 capfuls per 1/4 cup goes it's likely 1 capful is just too much for a 5 ml measure.

    What measuring tools/devices I'm using are wrong, or do I just have the wrong set of tablespoons and teaspoons, which cannot be as the measuring cups proved their validity?


    Have I been all this time measuring the wrong amount of Prime and other products to be added my aquarium?
    Last edited by LabTest57; 07-26-2009, 00:42.

  • #2
    Re: 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

    lmao dude you are one hell a thorn in the side of seachem arnt you lol hey but i hear ya .....

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

      Actually, to see if all my measuring tools were wrong, I used 3 different dropper bottles for measuring drops per ml. There's approximately 20 drops per ml (if we're talking about water), however, during each test it averaged to ~150 drops per capful. Now, I'm not even sure if I'm using the right dropper bottles.


      Also, I bought real measuring spoons and cups, but now each capful is equal to about 7.5 ml. I'd guess if you don't take out that round, white paper-like plastic that's about 1 milimeter thick at the base of the cap, it would measure 5 ml. Also, I've been filling the cap until water spills out; if I only fill to the last thread, it would be plausible that one capful is 5ml. Both of these things could make that slightest difference. However, 7.5 ml is 2.5 more than 5ml, which is half a cap!

      To be specific, I'm using the 250ml bottle of Prime, not the 2 or 4 liter bottles that have 10 ml bottle caps.

      [EDIT]: After some more testing, I realized that a 100 ml bottle of Prime equals to 3/4 of a cup, when 180 ml is supposed to equal 3/4 of a cup. I'm fairly convinced that seachem has all their 100 and 250 ml bottles of Prime printed with wrong measurements on the label. I wonder if all their products (not to offend you guys) has this same error in all instructions/directions and labels. Regardless if the concentrations seem to be less for any product, if Amquel products had the same problem, each capful would still treat just 10 gallons of water; if it were really 5 ml, each capful of Amquel would treat 5 gallons. In a sense, Prime will always be more concentrated than any other dechlorinator/detoxifier on the market as 5 ml would treat 25 gallons compared to 5 gallons (5 ml of Amquel).
      Last edited by LabTest57; 07-27-2009, 22:45.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

        Okay, you kind of lost me in the midst of this post but I will try to address your concerns accurately. The caps we use should have a circular seal in the bottom of them that will account for a particular volume. If the caps do not have the seal, then the average amount of one capful is closer to 6mL than five. Hopefully, you have the seal inside?

        The method that I used to determine the volume was as follows:

        Place cap on digital scale and tare the scale with the cap on it. Fill the cap with pure Deionized water (the density of pure water is 1g/cc) until full and then read the scale. The scale should read at 5g or close to it, which it did. As I said, without the seal, it read closer to 6g.

        As far as the 100mL bottles, we overfill these pretty significantly. You actually get about 120-125mL in each bottle. The bottle capacity is even larger, but we do not fill them to the top. Hope this answers your questions and please, rest assured, we do measure these things :)

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

          So your saying that accurate measurements are based on the weight of a liquid, meaning any other way of measuring a capful will give inaccurate results?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

            Knowing the density of the liquid and having an accurate scientific scale will give you most effective way to measure volume.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

              If we were measuring water w/o a scientific scale, would a capful equal ~10 ml? You can confirm this by simply filling two teaspoons with a capful of water (using the 5ml cap on a Prime bottle), which is fairly easy.

              I'm beginning to think that I had always been measuring all types of liquids,etc. the wrong way, and getting the wrong measurements.

              Now why would most manufactuers (not talking about Seachem) want to sell consumers measuring spoons, cups, etc. that would give you wrong measurements? I think the word I'm looking for is something like "General Approximation" for any type of liquid or solid being measured, however, it may be that some companies modifiy meauring cups to measure precisely the amount of chemcal/product "X" because measuring tools that rely on "general approximations" won't work based on the type of liquid being used.

              Is this somewhat right?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: 1 capful of Prime does not equal 5ml.

                We use a cap that gives a guideline of measurement. If a hobbyist is truly concerned about preciseness, he/she most likely won't be measuring via capfuls. I feel comfortable saying that no manufacturer in this industry "modifies" measuring tools for preciseness. We decide which packaging to use and base our decision on measuring the product most easily.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Prime doesn't have to be measured to the drop! I think it also depends on the chlorine(and/or chloramine) level in your tap water, too. I'm going to play around with that, at some point, to see the minimum amount of prime needed to dechlorinate 1.5 and 2.0 mg/L, but using a ml or two more than recommended is inconsequential, other than maybe going through a bit more Prime than you have to.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the post, Tyler! You are correct that Prime definitely does not need to be measured to the drop, as it is a very safe product, even when over dosed slightly. :)

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X