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  #1  
Old 06-01-2009, 15:37
LabTest57 LabTest57 is offline
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Prime, and Nitrates....

What's the recommended dosage to detoxify nitrates or just 40 ppm of nitrates? Also, if I had an aquarium without any filters, gravels, ornaments, but just fish, how would any of the fish respond to 200 ppm of detoxified nitrates (assuming the nitrates have been detoxified before adding it to the tank)? Is it possible for the "detoxified" effect to wear off, if the detoxified nitrates are in the water for more than a week? Does it still affect the fish's hemoglobin content and oxygen consumption, or are the detoxified nitrates still "non-toxic fertilizer" for plants?

Last edited by LabTest57; 06-01-2009 at 15:40.
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Old 06-01-2009, 16:09
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

Hello,

A single dose should suffice in detoxifying the 40 ppm of nitrates. Assuming the nitrates were detoxified, the fish should be fine since it will not be available to them. The nitrates will be detoxified for up to 48 hours. During that time, they will almost certainly be consumed by your bacterial filter/plants. Elevated nitrate can be toxic because it can convert oxygen carrying pigments (hemeglobin, hemocyanin) to forms such as methemoglobin, which are incapable of carrying oxygen; however, with nitrate and its low branchial permeability, it is significantly lower in toxicity (compared to NH3/NO2). The nitrates will still be available for plant fertilization. Thank you for your question and have a great day!

Last edited by Tech Support JS; 06-01-2009 at 16:20.
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  #3  
Old 06-01-2009, 17:18
LabTest57 LabTest57 is offline
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

Thanks. Okay, a single dose can detoxify 40 ppm, however, it seems that to detoxify nitrite, one would need to do a 3x to 5x dose as labeled on the instructions. How much of the chemical (the complexed hydrosulfite) in Prime will be used up, if only 40 ppm of nitrates were to be detoxified will a single dose (assuming nitrates is the only factor)? I would like this in percentage...

I'm asking this because I want to know if I add chloramine-treated tap water to the aqaurium, will the "free" inactive hydrosulfite chemical in the water detoxify the chloramines + ammonia that is being added to the aqaurium (i.e it will be enough to detoxify any chloramines/ammonia in the aquarium within 24 hours).

Last edited by LabTest57; 06-01-2009 at 17:24.
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  #4  
Old 06-01-2009, 18:34
farmhand farmhand is offline
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

I will try not to hijack this thread... but from what I have read above, if my Nitrates are at 40 ppm,(which they are) and I dose with Prime, the nitrates will be bound for up to 48 hours in which time the biofilter will convert them into... what??? Something which lessens the need for as many water changes? I have a overstocked 55 Gal fully cycled tank.
PH = 8.3
KH = 17
GH = 15-16
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  #5  
Old 06-01-2009, 19:01
LabTest57 LabTest57 is offline
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

I think it could work faster if you would use Stability after dosing with Prime, because there will be a higher concentration of facultative bacteria in the water to consume the detoxified nitrates. I guess the bacteria would consume the nitrates as soon as they are released into the water, before colonizing.

The bi-product from this type of bacteria should be nitrogen gas.

-aerobic bacteria = ammonia/nitrite-eaters
-anaerobic bacteria = nitrate-eaters
-facultative bacteria (supposebly a different strain) = nitrate-eaters

Last edited by LabTest57; 06-01-2009 at 19:38.
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  #6  
Old 06-02-2009, 09:09
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

farmhand,

The nitrate is converted to inert nitrogen gas that is gassed off and will no longer be present in the tank. With an overstocked tank, you will more thank likely always have higher than normal nitrates (here at Seachem, our overstocked cichlid tank typically runs pretty high nitrates). Prime will make them non toxic until your filter picks them up, but your fish will still be producing ammonia, which leads to nitrate. Stability will boost your biofilter with the anaerobic bacteria needed to convert more of the nitrates to inert nitrogen gas.

LabTest57,

That number is impossible to calculate. If you have amines in your tap water and treat with Prime, it will bind to the ammonia and render it non toxic instantly.

Thanks you guys for the posts!
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  #7  
Old 06-02-2009, 18:56
LabTest57 LabTest57 is offline
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

So, this can be done vice versa i.e. you add tap water to the aquarium and then Prime?

For example, I have a 180 gallon aquarium. I add/pour 5 gallons of tap water (chloramine-treated) to the tank. There is now some small percentage of toxic ammonia and/or chloramine in the water affecting the fish. If I add 0.5 ml of Prime, would that be sufficent in eliminating the "5 gallon" amount of chloramines,etc. in that larger volume of water, or should I dose for the whole tank (18 ml of Prime)?

Last edited by LabTest57; 06-03-2009 at 02:10.
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  #8  
Old 06-03-2009, 08:47
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

If you add the water to the aquarium before you treat with Prime, you should dose for the entire water volume (in your case, 180 gallons). It's recommended to treat the water before you add it to the aquarium, only dosing for the change water volume (in your case, 5 gallons). This will save you money and work more efficiently. Thanks!
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  #9  
Old 06-15-2009, 09:08
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Re: Prime, and Nitrates....

Hmmm... your post sounds familiar :)

Thanks!
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  #10  
Old 08-09-2009, 11:42
sostoudt sostoudt is offline
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Re: Prime and Nitrates

[QUOTE=Ranana_Mesy;5597]We do fully understand the chemical mechanisms that go on in all of our products but, as you can assume, releasing that information would not be the wisest business decision. Thanks for the posts[/QUOTE]
so wait your saying this statement is just lie to keep trade statements? it was taken from the prime FAQ

The detoxification of nitrite and nitrate by Prime (when used at elevated levels) is not well understood from a mechanistic standpoint.

i dont mean to seem difficult or trying to cause a problem. i am just curious.
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