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  #11  
Old 11-09-2011, 08:08
Troglodyte Troglodyte is offline
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Re: Prime questions...

Hi Tech team,
With regards to the above question on ammonia spikes and the possibility of the inhibition of the next bacteria, to break down the nitrite to nitrate. If i have understod you correctly, you are saying it removes this the ammonia spike and will also help prevent nitrite to nitrate inhibition due to high levels of ammonia. Is this correct? Also is this supported by scientific material? Could you also tell me if any of the claims made are supported by scientifically backed information or are they claims? As I am having trouble locating any supporting information on your web site?
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  #12  
Old 11-09-2011, 18:23
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Re: Prime questions...

Hello Troglodyte,

Thanks for the question. Prime converts ammonia into a complexed imidium salt. This salt is a nitrogenous compound that can still be utilized by aerobic bacteria. In the same way they consume ammonia, these bacteria consume the imidium salt and release nitrite as a byproduct. Prime will also bind with nitrite and nitrate, however, it will not prevent bacteria from consuming these compounds as well. Unfortunately, while we have researched it extensively in our laboratory, I do not have any documents that I can provide you as proof. However, if you wanted to test this, it would be very simple and could be done by treating tap water containing chloramine with Prime and adding it to an established aquarium. Also add a Seachem Ammonia Alert to give continuous free ammonia readings. Prime will break the chloramine bond, leaving behind ammonia. Unlike other water conditioners it will then bind to the ammonia, producing a non-toxic imidium salt. At this point you will see a 0.0 ammonia reading on the Ammonia Alert. After 24 hours, begin checking the Ammonia Alert every 30 minutes or so. After 24 hours, Prime will start to become inactive and if it is still binding any ammonia, it will begin to release it. If this is the case, the Ammonia Alert will begin changing color, giving you a reading for free ammonia.

If Prime works as we claim, which it alway does, you will not see any ammonia spikes. This is because, even when bound by Prime, the ammonia will be broken down by the biological filtration. Though not nearly as easy to test for, nitrite and nitrate are also still available for biological consumption in the aquarium even when they have been detoxified by Prime. Please let us know if you have any additional questions or if you need further clarification.
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  #13  
Old 11-10-2011, 20:15
Troglodyte Troglodyte is offline
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Re: Prime questions...

Thanks for the response and the information provided. I appreciate that this topic has been discussed previously within this forum so I appreciate your perseverance and patience in your explanations to assist us in understanding the processes involved.
I would like to know if the aerobic bacteria involved in the breakdown of the imidium salt are ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) or Nitrite Oxidising Bacteria (NOB). As I am sure you are aware both of these bacteria take a long time to reproduce. This could mean that the use of prime will continue and need to increase for some time before increasing levels of unbound ammonia (10-14 days) or nitrite (10-30 days) are removed and a tank initially cycled. Have Seachem any experience of testing this process to conclusion and cycled a tank with the use of prime and stability to a 0mg/l reading of ammonia and nitrite? If so can you share your results?
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  #14  
Old 11-11-2011, 18:16
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Re: Prime questions...

You are very welcome. This is always a topic of discussion amongst hobbyists and re-approaching it every so often is inevitable.

The imidium salt refers to the ammonia detoxification and therefore we are speaking of bacteria that oxidize ammonia in this scenario. While nitrifying bacteria, in general, reproduce more slowly than other types of bacteria, you must understand that the bacteria do not take weeks to reproduce, instead they may take up to one day in order to double their colony size. Hobbyists do not experience ammonia spikes in the aquarium because there is no consumption of ammonia occuring, but instead because the rate of ammonia production exceeds the capacity of the bacteria present at the moment. Using Prime every 24-48 hours will ensure that any new ammonia being produced is detoxified accordingly. I am sure that tests were run with standard nitrifying bacteria many years ago when this product was produced. Currently, all aquariums as Seachem have been successfully cycled using Stability (and Prime when necessary).
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  #15  
Old 12-01-2011, 20:47
Maggie Maggie is offline
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Re: Prime questions...

Is it safe to dose with Prime every 48 hours in an uncycled hospital tank where the fish is being treated daily with Melafix and Pimafix ? In other words will Prime interact with the medications in any way ?
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  #16  
Old 12-02-2011, 10:16
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Re: Prime questions...

Yes, it is safe to use Prime at the recommended dose every 48 hours in this case. The only medications that should not be mixed with reducing agents, such as Prime, are copper-based medications. Have a nice weekend!
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  #17  
Old 12-02-2011, 19:00
Maggie Maggie is offline
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Re: Prime questions...

Thank you very much. Great web site and great support.
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  #18  
Old 12-05-2011, 11:44
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Re: Prime questions...

You are very welcome! Thanks for the positive feedback!
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  #19  
Old 12-22-2011, 19:04
Troglodyte Troglodyte is offline
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Re: stability question...

Greetings tech support,
Another question for you. When using your product Stability I seem to get a very high reading of Nitrite. Could you tell me if this is due to the bacteria type eing used within it or is it a feed for the bacteria used?
Best Regards
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  #20  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:00
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Re: Prime questions...

Thanks for the post!

Stability will definitely not cause a rise in nitrites, as it contains beneficial aerobic and anaerobic bacteria that consume or feed off of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrates. Are you currently cycling your tank? Do you have a biological media such as Matrix in your filter? Having a good biological media is extremely important when using Stability, because by providing the bacteria contained in Stability with a home, they will be able to successfully colonize and reproduce on the media. Stability is an extremely safe product even when overdosed.

Hope this helps!
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