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  • Prime dosage

    Hi I live in a very soft water area and after contacting my tap water company they tell me that they put into the water virtually no Chlorine.

    Their water report seems to be telling me they add 0.4mg/l and using a Chlorine test kit I can't really register it. The lowest the kit does is 0.5mg/l

    So giving that my Chlorine supply is so low and Prime instructions say it does 3.3ml per 200L to remove 4mg/l of Chlorine, I guess I don't need to add so much? Would 0.5ml of Prime be more than enough for my 200L freshwater tank (sitting at 24C) when I do a 50% water change?

    I realise that the water company could at any time increase this level, but I usually use a cheap swimming pool dip stick to test free Chlorine levels before I do a water change. Can't be too careful. ;-)

  • #2
    Re: Prime dosage

    To be honest, I would dose according to the label so that there is really no need to worry about it, just in case they decide to start adding more chlorine/chloramine to the water. I'm sure that the amount can vary or change at any time. It is always best to be safe than sorry in my opinion. As a side note, for smaller doses the instructions are 2 drops of Prime per gallon of water. I hope this helps! :-)

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    • #3
      Re: Prime dosage

      Well I'm trying to save myself some money and it seems to me that if the Chlorine is 0.4mg/l then I can use far less Prime.

      So would a dose of 0.5ml of Prime treat a 200L volume of water assuming it does have this level of Chlorine in it?

      Let me worry about possible fluctuating values. :-)

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      • #4
        Re: Prime dosage

        Yes, 0.5 ml of Prime will be just fine to treat 200L of water with 0.4mg/l of chlorine.

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        • #5
          Re: Prime dosage

          It states that Prime detoxifies heavy metals. Does it remove copper,lead, zinc, and other heavy metals? How much does a single does (0.1 ml) remove of the three metals listed? Does Prime bind to the metals and make them permanently insoluble or unable to react with any other ion in the aquarium "forever - until manually removed via filtration/water change"?

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          • #6
            Re: Prime dosage

            Prime reduces heavy metals that are found in tap water at typical concentrations. Typical concentrations are normally very low because tap water is for human consumption. Heavy metals include lead, copper, nickel, zinc, iron, etc. If a person has high amounts of heavy metals in their tap water that are above normal, then he/she may want to consider filtering their tap water with an RO unit prior to use. The primary function of Prime is to detoxify chlorine, ammonia, nitrite, chloramine, and nitrate. Prime will reduce and detoxify heavy metals, and make them fall out of solution (the by-product would be a salt). So, yes, the metals will technically still be in the aquarium; they can become "available" again if your pH were to ever drop significantly.

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            • #7
              Re: Prime dosage

              Originally posted by Tech Support DD View Post
              Prime reduces heavy metals that are found in tap water at typical concentrations. Typical concentrations are normally very low because tap water is for human consumption. Heavy metals include lead, copper, nickel, zinc, iron, etc. If a person has high amounts of heavy metals in their tap water that are above normal, then he/she may want to consider filtering their tap water with an RO unit prior to use. The primary function of Prime is to detoxify chlorine, ammonia, nitrite, chloramine, and nitrate. Prime will reduce and detoxify heavy metals, and make them fall out of solution (the by-product would be a salt). So, yes, the metals will technically still be in the aquarium; they can become "available" again if your pH were to ever drop significantly.
              What is typical concentrations? Give me any estimate...

              Also, would 'a significant drop in ph' mean a ph below 7 or just huge drop in the alkaline range (8.0 to 7.0)?


              [EDIT]: Water quality reports from last year in my state ---> http://www.miamidade.gov/wasd/library/report/water_quality_2008.pdf


              It says that "copper" ranges from 0.07 to 1.3 ppm
              it says that "lead" ranges from 1.2 to 15 ppm
              it says that "nickel" ranges from 1.3 to 100 ppm

              I don't think Prime would remove that much, right?
              Last edited by LabTest57; 09-01-2009, 12:04.

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              • #8
                Re: Prime dosage

                bump..(too soon, but no one has anwered my questions, yet)

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                • #9
                  Re: Prime dosage

                  Some calculations have to be done in order to give you an exact amount. We will provide you with that information as soon as we have it. Thanks for your patience.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Prime dosage

                    We apologize for the delay in response. Upon closer inspection of the Water Quality Report that you provided, one can notice a few things. First, please note the change from ppm to ppb for lead and nickel. The amounts reported as detected averages in a survey of homes supplied water tested by 3 facilities are as follows:

                    Copper = 0.07 - 0.92 ppm
                    Lead = 1.2 - 4.0 ppb
                    Nickel = ND - 1.3 ppb

                    This would be the average range detected for the Miami area for the year 2008. The area water for 2009 can be assumed similar in composition. These values, unfortunately, do not describe the form that these metals are found in the water.

                    The Action Levels (AL) are as follows:

                    Copper = 1.3 ppm
                    Lead = 15 ppb
                    Nickel = 100 ppb

                    If more than 10% of the homes surveyed for copper and lead test with numbers above or at the AL, then water treatment facilities must take action to reduce levels. Every county report lists the AL in one column, then lists the detected levels in a separate column. The detected levels and the AL are not the range for the water report. Limits are the concentrations set by the EPA; so, typical values will be values below the EPA limit.

                    Also: the drop in pH required would be in the acidic range of pH (below 7.0). The lower pH goes/drops in an aquarium, the more available/soluble heavy metals will become (it will also depend upon many other factors in an aquarium environment).

                    To answer your other question about Prime and heavy metals: the standard dose of Prime (1 mL/10 gallons) will remove:

                    Copper - 2.6 ppm in 10 gallons
                    or
                    Lead - 8.5 ppm in 10 gallons
                    or
                    Nickel - 2.4 ppm in 10 gallons

                    We say "or" between each because that is the maximum amount of each that can be removed assuming none of the other components are present. So for example, one could remove 1.3 ppm of copper and 4.4 ppm of lead or any other variety of differing ratios between them. The relative order of preferential removal should be in the order of lead, then copper, then nickel.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Prime dosage

                      Wow, so lead and nickel are actually very low (i.e. lead would be 15/1000 ppm and nickel 100/1000 ppm).

                      Thanks, for the info. Prime works like a charm for removing heavy metals. :)

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                      • #12
                        Re: Prime dosage

                        You are very welcome :-)

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                        • #13
                          I know this is a old thread, but we are discussing the effects of Prime on metals on the barreport.com (I am a moderator there) and we'd like to have more information about what's the pH level threshold that can unbind metals and get them back into water. Is that under pH 6? Or under pH 5? Or even lower than that?

                          Thank you in advance for any clarifications.

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for the post fablau! The components in Prime will start to breakdown when they are exposed to a pH lower than 4.

                            I hope this helps!

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                            • #15
                              Thank you very much for your reply, that's really appreciated. On the behalf of our passionate community, we'd love to have this additional information if possible:

                              1. Besides Zn and Cu, what other traces can be affected by Prime? For example, are Ni, Co, V, Rb and Mo affected in any similar way?

                              2. How long after dosing Prime will added micro nutrients be affected? 24, 48 hours or more?

                              3. Is Prime binding to metals by reduction, or binding by forming salt with phosphate?

                              4. Assuming Prime is binding Zn and Cu so strongly, is that why your Trace product includes such a high concentration of Zn and Cu, maybe to compensate Prime's usage and reduction of such elements?

                              Thank you again!

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