Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Prime

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Prime

    Hello,
    Could you please tell me if Prime contains more then .2% Formaldehyde.

    Regards Gaust

  • #2
    Re: Prime

    Prime does not contain any formaldehyde. It is a proprietary aqueous solution of complexed hydrosulfite salts. I hope this helps!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Prime

      Originally posted by Tech Support AN View Post
      Prime does not contain any formaldehyde. It is a proprietary aqueous solution of complexed hydrosulfite salts. I hope this helps!
      Thank you for this,
      But it seems to be in contradiction to this
      http://www.seachem.com/Library/SeaGrams/Ammonia_Management.pdf

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Prime

        Sorry for the delay in response.

        The Ammonia Management SeaGram states:

        "The classical reaction of ammonia with formaldehyde to form methenamine is the principal of most ammonia removing conditioners. It may be used either directly or as a bisulfite complex. The bisulfite formaldehyde complex has the advantage of odor control, enhanced reaction time, and improved methenamine stability."

        This is the principal of MOST water conditioners, but not ours. The active ingredient in Prime is very similar and functions in the same manner, but does NOT contain formaldehyde.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Prime

          Originally posted by Tech Support AN View Post
          Sorry for the delay in response.

          The Ammonia Management SeaGram states:

          "The classical reaction of ammonia with formaldehyde to form methenamine is the principal of most ammonia removing conditioners. It may be used either directly or as a bisulfite complex. The bisulfite formaldehyde complex has the advantage of odor control, enhanced reaction time, and improved methenamine stability."

          This is the principal of MOST water conditioners, but not ours. The active ingredient in Prime is very similar and functions in the same manner, but does NOT contain formaldehyde.
          Thank you,
          Your responses are very prompt,

          Safe™ is the dry version of Prime® and shares all of it’s advantages; however, Safe™ is even more concentrated than Prime®.

          On safe's MSDS it states that it is also complexed hydrosulfite salts, one of the hazardous by products as a result of decomposition is Formaldehyde.
          I know your time is valuable but can you please explain this.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Prime

            You are very welcome!

            By law we are required to list the hazardous decomposition by products of every compound we sell, even though the decomposition will not occur if the product is used properly. We sell Safe as a powder to use in an aquarium tank; that is, to dissolve in water. If you decide that instead of putting it into an aquarium you think it would be a good idea to put it into a fire, you may form the hazardous decomposition product formaldehyde. Note the word "form". Formaldehyde is not present in the product, but may be formed if heated to a high enough temperature.

            This is exactly the same thing one would see on a material safety data sheet for wood, were such a thing required. If heated, wood emits the hazardous decomposition product carbon monoxide. That is quite a different thing from stating that each tree contains carbon monoxide. Trees do not contain carbon monoxide, but may decompose to form carbon monoxide.

            I hope this helps!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Prime

              Just wondering at what temperature it does decompose to form Formaldehyde as I think bisulfite salts will melt at 50 degrees C and will reach flashpoint at 100 degrees C.

              I would expect that the products when shipped would be in a container and here in Australia we do get some rather high temperatures not to mention the temperatures it would reach inside being inside a transit shipping container.

              I would think that in transit it may be exposed to conditions outside that of what is considered normal use?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Prime

                We have no reason to believe that any extreme temperatures during transport cause this product to decompose into formaldehyde as this would only occur at temperatures above 200 degrees C. While I am sure that temperatures in Australia can get quite high, I can find no information that leads me to believe such temperatures could be achieved in a shipping container that is not on fire. I did find a study performed by PARBICA that took place in the Northern Territory that gave me some info on temperatures inside shipping containers stored in the region. According to this study, the highest temperature achieved inside the container was 35 degrees C. While I am sure the temperature varies throughout the continent, this is a good indicator that it can not reach 200 C. Even when containers are crossing the equator, the highest temperatures I can find record of are still less than 50 degrees C.

                The chances of formaldehyde forming in this product are really next to nothing. For temperatures to become high enough, the product will pretty much have to be on fire. I hope this helps to alleviate you concerns, please let us know if you have additional questions.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Prime

                  Thank you for your response.

                  On your Facebook for Seachem they mention " While Safe and Prime are meant to accomplish the same goal, the exact components are not identical. The MSDS sheet lists byproducts with respect to air decomposition, not solution-based decomposition."

                  Could you please explain what is meant by air decomposition.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Prime

                    Sure, The Tech Den, I will try and elaborate on this point. Basically, the intent of Material Safety Data Sheets is to provide information, such as physical properties, reactivity data, et cetera focusing primarily on potential hazards of working with a material in an occupational setting. They are therefore not primarily intended for use by the general consumer.

                    With that said, Section V contains information on reactivity data. Potential hazardous decomposition or byproducts for Safe (as listed, formaldehyde or sulfur dioxide) would potentially occur only as an unnatural, intentional chemical reaction brought about in a laboratory/industrial setting by heating the product to a temperature of 200 degrees C. This would never occur when Safe is used for any of its intended purposes in an aquarium setting, for a consumer's application, or in the bottle itself, for that matter. Therefore, this is what we intended to get across with the statement "The MSDS sheet lists byproducts with respect to air decomposition, not solution-based decomposition".

                    The full MSDS for Safe can be viewed here:

                    http://www.seachem.com/support/MSDS/Safe.doc.pdf

                    Hope that helps somewhat. Have a wonderful evening!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X